Peshawar – School Days

 

- Sant Kirpal Singh -

 

 

 

“When I was in Peshawar, studying in the ninth grade, I used
to take my books to study in a garden named Shahi Bagh.”

Sant Kirpal Singh

 

 

 

 

1899  Kirpal Singh joined Edwardes Church Mission High School, Peshawar.

 

“I used to study in a Christian school, and always had an inquisitive nature. I knew that we said “Shri Guru Nanak Dev Ji Maharaj,” for in India we attach many respectful terms to the names of Masters and certain respected people, and had noticed that the Christians called their great Saint merely Jesus. So I went to a Christian bishop and questioned him: ‘Why do you not put a prefix to Christ’s name, when even the most insignificant common man is at least referred to as Mr. Somebody?’ The bishop said, and I can still distinctly remember his reply, ‘We consider Christ the son of God, and as we cannot glorify God, so we cannot extol Christ. If we start prefixing his name, we will make him smaller, not greater.’ ”

Sant Kirpal Singh

 

“When I was in school, there was one geometrical problem and the professor came in to the class and said, ‘You could not solve this geometrical problem last year.’ He addressed me and one or two more, ‘Try tomorrow – tomorrow is Sunday. Try to see if this could be solved.’ The next morning I went and sat down. First I solved that problem in a very long way, then in a short-cut way. On Monday we attended the school. He asked, ‘Well, have you come to any conclusions? Have you solved the problem?’ ‘Yes,’ I told him, ‘I have solved it in two ways.’ I showed him on the board. Teacher naturally likes students like that.”

Sant Kirpal Singh

 

“As a student, I was reading in the ninth class and the teacher was so satisfied with me that he would leave the class to me for teaching in his absence – that very class in which I was a student. So hard work is another name for genius, mind that.”

Sant Kirpal Singh

 

1911  Kirpal Singh graduated from Edwardes Church Mission High School, Peshawar, at the top of His class.

 

1911  Kirpal Singh joined the Military Engineering Service at Peshawar.

 


 

 

Peshawar City History

Peshāwar (Urdu: پشاور) literally means City on the Frontier in Persian and is known as Pakhor in Pashto. It is the provincial capital of Pakistan's North-West Frontier Province. Located west of the Bara River on the edge of the Khyber Pass, Peshawar is the commercial, economic, political and cultural capital of the Pakistani frontier and, particularly, of the Pashtuns. In ancient times the city was known as Purushapura when it served as the eastern capital of the ancient Greco-Buddhist kingdom of Gandhara. The city was captured by the Muslims in 988 and named Peshawar by the Mughal emperor Akbar. From the 16th century it was ruled by the Afghans. 1849 – 1947 it was under British control and served as an important military base. For much of its history, Peshawar was one of the main trading centers on the ancient Silk Road and a major crossroads for various cultures between the subcontinent and Central Asia.

Until the 1950ies, Peshawar was enclosed within a city wall and sixteen gates. Of the old city gates the most famous was the Kabuli Gate, but only the name remains now. It leads out to the Khyber Pass and on to Kabul. The Qissa Khawani Bazaar (“Street of Story-tellers”) extends from east to west in the heart of the city of Peshawar. Two splendid old gardens are the Shahi Bagh in the north-east and the Wazir Bagh in the south-east, all of which give Peshawar the character of a garden city. Between the old city wall and the railway station in the west, in Dabgari Garden, stands the tomb of Nawab Sayid Khan, the Mughal governor during Emperor Shah Jehan’s rule who died in year 1651 AD. Since the early 1900s, the structure serves as Christian Mission Church.

 

City Maps

Old Peshawar (city map, 643 kb)

Peshawar 2006 (high resolution Google Earth satellite image, 2680 kb)

Peshawar 2006 (medium resolution Google Earth satellite image, 940 kb)

 

 

Peshawar Historic Pictures Gallery

Click on thumbnails to enlarge

Taxila Gate
Peshawar 1879

Kabuli Gate
Peshawar 1891

Kabuli Gate
Peshawar 1903

 

Quizza Khawani Bazaar
with Kabuli Gate 1903

Quizza Khawani Bazaar
Peshawar 1903

 

 


 

 

Edwardes Church Mission High School

On 19 December, 1853 a meeting was arranged under the Commissioner of Peshawar, Sir Herbert Edwardes, to discuss a Christian Mission to the city. The very first school in the province was established in 1855 by one of the first missionaries, Robert Clarke, under the patronage of Sir Herbert Edwardes. It is located near Kohati Gate, Peshawar City, and named Edwardes Church Mission High School.

Kirpal Singh joined the Edwardes Church Mission High School in 1899.

 

Location

Edwardes High School ( on maps) is located just 150 m (1/10 mile) north-east of Kohati Gate, which no longer exists today (see Old Peshawar map). From Master’s school, Qissa Khawani Bazaar is just 400 m (1/4 mile) north, and from there, another 400 m (1/4 mile) west, was Kabuli Gate. Shahi Bagh (“Great Garden”, on maps) where Kirpal Singh used to walk, taking His books with Him to study, is located 2 km (1 mile) north from Edwardes High School, beyond the old city wall and the railroad track.

 

Edwardes College, Peshawar, established in 1900, is an offspring of the Edwardes High School.

 

 

Centenary Celebrations of
Edwardes College, Peshawar

Date of Issue: April 24, 2000

 

 

 

 

Edwardes High School and Mission Chapel Picture Gallery

Click on thumbnails to enlarge




Edwardes High School
Peshawar

Edwardes High School
Peshawar

Edwardes High School
Peshawar

 





Edwardes Higher
Secondary School

Edwardes Higher
Secondary School

Edwardes Higher
Secondary School

Edwardes Higher
Secondary School

 





Mission Chapel,
Dabgari Garden

Mission Chapel Entrance Door

Inside
Mission Chapel

Mission Chapel
Organ (~ 1900)

 

 


 

 

 

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